Review: The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh

Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers
Release Date: May 12, 2015
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9780399176654
Pages: 395
Read in: December 2016
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Goodreads Summary:

One Life to One Dawn.

In a land ruled by a murderous boy-king, each dawn brings heartache to a new family. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, is a monster. Each night he takes a new bride only to have a silk cord wrapped around her throat come morning. When sixteen-year-old Shahrzad’s dearest friend falls victim to Khalid, Shahrzad vows vengeance and volunteers to be his next bride. Shahrzad is determined not only to stay alive, but to end the caliph’s reign of terror once and for all.

Night after night, Shahrzad beguiles Khalid, weaving stories that enchant, ensuring her survival, though she knows each dawn could be her last. But something she never expected begins to happen: Khalid is nothing like what she’d imagined him to be. This monster is a boy with a tormented heart. Incredibly, Shahrzad finds herself falling in love. How is this possible? It’s an unforgivable betrayal. Still, Shahrzad has come to understand all is not as it seems in this palace of marble and stone. She resolves to uncover whatever secrets lurk and, despite her love, be ready to take Khalid’s life as retribution for the many lives he’s stolen. Can their love survive this world of stories and secrets?

Inspired by A Thousand and One Nights, The Wrath and the Dawn is a sumptuous and enthralling read from beginning to end.


I loved it. Struggled for a little bit but then once I got into it, I couldn’t stop, simply because it was so damn good. (Also, I was unable to sleep but that’s an entirely different matter).

The writing was brilliant – it took me a while to get settled in but after about 100 pages I was fully immersed. Continue reading

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Review: The Hidden Oracle by Rick Riordan

Publisher: Puffin
Release Date: May 3, 2016
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9780141363936
Pages: 359
Read in: May 2016
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How do you punish an immortal?

By making him human.

After angering his father Zeus, the god Apollo is cast down from Olympus. Weak and disorientated, he lands in New York City as a regular teenage boy. Now, without his godly powers, the four-thousand-year-old deity must learn to survive in the modern world until he can somehow find a way to regain Zeus’s favour.

But Apollo has many enemies – gods, monsters and mortals who would love to see the former Olympian permanently destroyed. Apollo needs help, and he can think of only one place to go . . . an enclave of modern demigods known as Camp Half-Blood.


I think the following encapsulates the entire book:

Used to be goddy

Now uptown feeling shoddy

Bah, haiku don’t rhyme

While I really enjoyed the book as a whole, I didn’t get the same feeling I did when I was reading Percy Jackson back in the days. Now don’t get me wrong, I loved Uncle Rick’s sarcasm and humour that’s scattered throughout, but I don’t think this book was a strong as it could’ve been. Continue reading